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Ouro Preto, Minas Gerais. One of Brazil’s most-loved places. 

(Source: 500px.com)

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Paraty, Rio de Janeiro. One of Brazil’s most-loved places. 

(Source: 500px.com)

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Buffalo New Urbanism Film Fest

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"In their headlong search for modernity through mobility, American urbanites made a decision to destroy the living environments of nineteenth-century neighborhoods by converting their gathering places into traffic jams, their playgrounds into motorways, and their shopping places into elongated parking lots. These paving decisions effectively made obsolete many of urban America’s older neighborhoods."

Mcshane, C. (1979). Transforming the Use of Urban Space – Look at the Revolution in Street Pavements, 1880-1924. Journal of Urban History, 5(3), 279-307. (p.300)

(Source: citymaus)

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The West Village. Urbanism done correctly.

The West Village. Urbanism done correctly.

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Piazza del Campidoglio, Rome by Michelangelo 
Renaissance humanist urbanism at its best. 

Piazza del Campidoglio, Rome by Michelangelo 

Renaissance humanist urbanism at its best. 

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Town Hall at Windsor, Florida by Leon Krier

Town Hall at Windsor, Florida by Leon Krier

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Andres Duany

Andres Duany

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“Five plus four and a door: The simplicity of a traditional facade acknowledges the presence of a larger community. Variety occurs not within the single house but among many.” - Suburban Nation 

Five plus four and a door: The simplicity of a traditional facade acknowledges the presence of a larger community. Variety occurs not within the single house but among many.” - Suburban Nation 

humansofnewyork:

"One day a crazy looking homeless guy came to the door, and we were about to close the door on him, but my mother saw him and shouted: ‘Hey Eugene!’ She knew his name! Then she ran around the kitchen putting all sorts of food into tupperware, and brought it out to him. After he left, we asked my mom why she gave him so much food. She told us: ‘You never know how Jesus is going to look when he shows up.’ She was always saying that— it was a spiritual thing. Then you know what happened? Two months later, that same man showed up on the door step, clean shaven, and wearing a suit. And he had an envelope with money for my mother. ‘Ms. Rosa always believed in me,’ he said. I’ll never forget it! Eugene was his name."

humansofnewyork:

"One day a crazy looking homeless guy came to the door, and we were about to close the door on him, but my mother saw him and shouted: ‘Hey Eugene!’ She knew his name! Then she ran around the kitchen putting all sorts of food into tupperware, and brought it out to him. After he left, we asked my mom why she gave him so much food. She told us: ‘You never know how Jesus is going to look when he shows up.’ She was always saying that— it was a spiritual thing. Then you know what happened? Two months later, that same man showed up on the door step, clean shaven, and wearing a suit. And he had an envelope with money for my mother. ‘Ms. Rosa always believed in me,’ he said. I’ll never forget it! Eugene was his name."

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The Maine Vernacular

(Source: whittenarchitects.com)

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New Urban Classics by Robert Martignoni 

(Source: bsahomeplans.com)

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Bolshaya Izhora, Russia

Located 40 km (25 miles) from Saint Petersburg, Russia, Novaja Izhora represents the emerging Russian economy’s investment in its domestic infrastructure and its increased international appeal.

Likewise, the growing Russian upper and middle classes are aspiring to strengthen their ancestral connection to the countryside. Bolshaya’s New Urbanist master plan offers an alternative to the recent scattering of commercial centers and gated cottage clusters being built around St. Petersburg’s growing periphery. The 50 hectare (124 acre) planned resort village sits on a unique parcel of land with approximately 4km (2.5 miles) of frontage along the southern banks of the Gulf of Finland, and is located to the west of St. Petersburg in an area known for its summer royal palaces, more modest weekend retreats (dachas) and country farmsteads.

The village will feature a 200-room five-star hotel with a spa and wellness center and conference facility meant to attract both local visitors and those from abroad. The hotel campus will also feature an entertainment and sport complex, and a series of detached cottages that will blend with the surrounding mixed-use neighborhood’s architecture. Positioned in the Lomonosovskii region on the principal 2-lane highway west from the City, just off of the rail line, and nearly adjacent to a newly constructed beltway road, Novaja Izhora will be well connected to Saint Petersburg.

There exists a series of historic villages along the gulf front built around several palaces, including Peterhof and Oranienbaum, that offers a regional framework into which this project can logically fit, with a hotel serving as the community’s focal point as the palaces once did. The land features a low lying flat area near the water that was once a sand mining operation and an upland towards the highway consisting of tall pine trees and moderately sloping terrain. The site is known locally as a prime location from which to observe the annual coastal swan migration. The master plan consequently incorporates a more geometric grid of smaller house lots on the flat land with many streets and pedestrian paths leading to a public promenade along the Gulf, while the upland accommodates the larger homesites and a more organic network of topographically responsive streets.

Bisecting the two neighborhoods and perpendicular to the Gulf is a Main Street that acts as a spine, connecting an arrival square off the highway to a town square at the center of the village, and ultimately to a hotel forecourt plaza. Secondary east-west streets weave through the village and link the potential marinas at either end. Planned in collaboration with DPZ Europe and an international team of architects and planners, Bolshaya is DPZ’s first project in Russia.

(Source: dpz.com)

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Housing London | a Mid-rise Solution

A plan for increasing housing options in London from the Prince’s Foundation.

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urbangeographies:

Scenes of the West Village, NYC

Pictured here are the streets that Jane Jacobs rhapsodized about in her classic Life and Death of Great American Cities. Preserved as an historic district in 1969, Greenwich Village has largely retained its human-scaled streetscapes and historic residential façades, despite subsequent gentrification that made it a much more expensive place than when Jacobs wrote about the “Hudson Street Ballet.” This enduring appeal undoubtedly reflects the area’s historic charm and walkability, recently enhanced by the addition of bicycling. I once lived in an apartment near the intersection of West 10th and West 4th Streets — as illustrated by one photo above. It has always amused me that amid Manhattan’s orthogonal grid-iron plan one could encounter this odd intersection, but then the West Village is a crazily fun helter-skelter of streets. What would Jane Jacobs say about her old neighborhood today?